Monday, 7 October 2013

Crime; one road to writing success

I'm not referring to the genre; rather, the behaviour of the writer.

Of course, we already knew this, but one way to get noticed is to commit a crime. Today, I read that Vicky Pryce, disgraced ex-wife of the disgraced Chris Huhne, fresh from prison, is having her experiences serialised in a national newspaper. Presumably, they will then come out in book form, and will sell at least reasonably well. Next, no doubt, she will be appearing in 'I'm a Celebrity', or 'Strictly Come Dancing'. From now on, only way is up.

The road to success is often paved with crime/sin. Take the Hamiltons (Neil and Christine, of 'cash for questions' fame; David Mellor - disgraced MP, who now presents a show on Classic FM). And these are only two. Jeffrey Archer's career admittedly didn't need much of a boost, but prison certainly did him no harm.

Naturally, it helps if you are a public figure in the first place, and lesser mortals like me (to date, several parking fines and a speeding offence) are not important enough to be noticed unless we resort to crimes on  a Great Train Robbery scale, but it's all worth bearing in mind.

So come on, fellow-writers (or those who could do with a little help). There must be something we can do. Any suggestions?

27 comments:

  1. It's only a month till Bonfire night. For four hundred years we have celebrated failure.
    Guy or Guido Garrood has a grand ring to it. Perhaps you could succeed where he failed.

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    1. Not sure about that, Adrian. But thanks, anyway.

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    2. Keep writing.
      I have just finished reading about the birds book, I couldn't put it down and it wold make a superb film.

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    3. Thanks so much, Adrian. And for the very kind comments on your blog. That book is my own favourite (but I think you knew that)!

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    4. I recently read that one too and have to say it crossed my mind more than once too, that it could be a film. Actually I still sort of have images in my head from it - which is far from always the case after a few weeks (and other books) have passed.

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    5. You're very kind, DT. In fact a producer has been trying for some time to get the backing for a screenplay of one of my novels, but the recession has rather scuppered it

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  2. I've had three parking tickets, but I don't think I've got the nerve to go for the big one: 'She murdered her husband to finish her novel!'
    It's worth thinking about - perhaps in the next book?
    Only celebrities/politicians have the advantage, and can more-or-less get away with crimes.

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    1. That's why we ordinary mortals have to go for the big ones (great trains etc), Fanny.

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  3. When I was five, a stole a rubber thingy that goes on the end of a tap to direct water into the sink... would that secure me a book deal do you think?

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    1. Theft fo a rubber thingy...ts ts, Wendy.

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  4. Hi Frances, I am a writer too with 2 books published by a Christian publisher, so I probably should stay away from major crimes as a PR tool. LOL. Although Johnny Depp once said, interviewed after trashing a hotel room "there is no such thing as bad PR."

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    1. I think Johnny Depp was right. I thought of riding naked on my horse from Devizes to Swindon as a publicity stunt, but decided it would be too uncomfortable. Sigh.

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  5. Isn't there a well-worn (to the point of having become threadbare) piece of advice for aspiring authors, saying that thou shalt not write about what thou don't know anything about?
    Therefore, in theory, all those writers of thrillers and mysteries must have committed similar crimes themselves. And what about the writers of Fantasy and Science Fiction? Or pornographic novels?

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    1. if you only write from experience (and that is certainly important), what part does imagination play, Meike?

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  6. As I'm never likely to write a short story never mind a novel and, hopefully, never commit a crime resulting in imprisonment and as I can offer absolutely no advice to your fellow writer/bloggers I have decided not to comment on this post.

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    1. Quite right, too, GB. Plus, think of the time you've saved.

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  7. The whole celebrity thing annoys me intensely and the crime element is a step too in their career!

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    1. Oh, me too, Rosemary. As for the word 'celeb', it makes me feel physically ill. I've thought of startging a blog /website entitled "I'mnotacelebrity.com". Anyone want to join me?

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  8. Well, you must be doing something right with a testimonial like this one. Don't commit a crime -- just keep writing. Word will eventually get around! (Moral: Slow and steady wins the race. Perhaps it has already been used.)

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    1. Thanks, RWP. It's a tough world out there for novelists, and I'm really grateful to Adrian for his kind comments.

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  9. As the unknown writer maybe I should get a publishing deal for being less famous than most i.e. the novelty of being unknown should be a great selling point. :-) Rare = valuable = Worth more! One can always live in hope :-(

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  10. But do you really, really want to be that famous Frances? I know I don't. I like anonimity; being able to go out of the house without facing the cameras. Every word you tweeted would be scrutinized. Who am I kidding that it could ever happen to me anyway?

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    1. No, no. Not famous, Maggie. Just rich will do nicely.

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  11. Given that the rulers of modern societies - financial institutions - commit fraud every day there's a fat chance that if I write a crime novel it will ever match up to their iniquities.

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    1. Give it a try! After all, what have you got to lose?

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