Thursday, 19 July 2018

I have a problem with issues

I know I've said it before, but where have all the problems gone? They've all turned magically into "issues". No one has problems any more; just issues. When I have a problem, it's a problem. Are we all in denial? People have knee issues and hip issues and back issues, and teenage children issues. No, no, no! If you have an issue with your knee, it hurts. It's not an issue. It's a problem. And if you have an issue with a teenager, then that's definitely a problem.

Well, isn't it?

(This unimportant post was written to ensure a new password works. If you're not reading it, then the password hasn't worked. I have a big problem - yes, PROBLEM-  with passwords.)

20 comments:

  1. Not sure whether I'll be able to comment ( tending to have a colourful variety of 'issues' with Googe etc lately) but here goes

    ReplyDelete
  2. I totally agree with you. The young folks I work with will NEVER say "problems" and when I say that "P" word, they will even say, "don't you mean ISSUES?" Drives me nuts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I imagine they reply "no problem!" when someone says "thank you" to them ;-)

      Delete
    2. Oh good! I'm glad you agree, Kay.

      Delete
  3. I have problems with other peoples issues.
    Noisy little sods they are.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Issues... "I enjoyed reading the July issue of 'Yorkshire Living', but won't buy the August issue."
    I would also say that 2018 for me was dominated by health issues - not necessarily problems, but things that needed to be dealt with.
    There are of course also problems I have to (or want to) sort out, but I can not solve other people's problems.

    Have I used both terms correctly in my comment?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Your new password works.

    “If you have an issue, grab a tissue.” —Shakespeare

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you sure that's Shakespeare, RWP? Hmm.

      Delete
  6. I never know whether to pronounce it as 'iss-yoo' or 'ish-yoo'.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I pronounce it issyoo, Keith. After all, that's the way it's spelled!

      Delete
    2. Frances given the vagaries of pronunciation of the English language the way something is spelt is the last criteria I would think of. Having said that I, too, pronounce it issyou.

      Delete
  7. Quite true, Frances. Everything is blown out of proportion these days - why did they start naming what used to be very high winds (or even gales)?

    ReplyDelete
  8. And I have a problem with problems. It was a word I used a lot professionally until someone pointed out that it made me (a very positive person) sound like a very negative person. It's not a word I use much now. But then I don't use issue much either.

    ReplyDelete