Thursday, 5 September 2013

On a lighter note

After my last, rather wallowing, post, I though I'd lighten things up a bit on this blog with a follow-on from my grandsons' recent visit.

We were discussing the evils of  lying, but the necessity of lying occasionally to save somebody's feelings

Me: for example,  when you receive a present, and you don't really like it, but you want to say something polite. What would you say?

Eleven-year old grandson (after much deliberate thought): Have you kept the receipt?

Well, at least it's along the right lines...

18 comments:

  1. Ha ha. My nine year old grandson was with me at my mother's for lunch over the holidays. I knew it was shepherds pie and also knew he didn't like it so I took him aside and told him that it's only polite when someone has spent a great deal of time preparing food for you, to pretend you like it. This is his reaction when it was placed in front of him. "Oh, Nan. That is the best, best, most wonderful shepherds pie I have ever had in my whole life and I wish I could have it every day." I think he deserved an Oscar!(a little over the top maybe but it was very funny).

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  2. When I was about seventeen, I somehow gave my mother one of those two-tier cake stands for her birthday. She said “thank you” most eloquently: it was all it took.

    When we cleared out her effects fifty-odd years later, it was still there.

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  3. Oh, that's so funny, Frances, and Wendy's story and Tim's are good fun, too.
    Still laughing,
    K

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  4. Just out of curiosity - what do you say when someone gives you a present which you don't like?
    Your grandson's answer is polite and honest at the same time - the giver of that present will not repeat the mistake!

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    1. I find something nice to say; "lovely colour", or "how thoughtful!"...or, well, you get the idea.

      But my kids can always tell when I'm not being absolutely straight with them, and that's a problem. They say I have a 'lying face' (no idea what that is!).

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  5. I love it! What a great answer :-) x

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  6. Perhaps a simple "Thank you" would have been acceptable. It seems to me that it is an under-used expression these days.

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    1. Of course one must say thank you, but it never seems to be quite enough, especially in a thank-you letter. A bit peremptory? I always feel something more is needed.

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    2. I agree that it is not enough in a letter but face to face when one doesn't really like something? I have found over many years that even very well brought up children seem to take gifts for granted and 'thank you' is rare unless the gift is actually put into the hand. I have friends who have a rule that no 'thank you' means 'no more'. She has cut her present recipient list amongst the family's children dramatically. After many year of no acknowledgements as to even whether the presents had been received (I knew they had been because they were delivered) I stopped giving to some as well. I even gave a reasonable cheque for a wedding present a few years ago. It has been cashed. I'm just assuming that it was cashed by the intended couple. Perhaps they didn't think it was reasonable enough and couldn't find a way of saying that.

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    3. I totally agree, GB. Thank yous seem to be going out of fashion. And thank you letters are now a rare treat. The sad thing is that they take so little time to write, and are so much appreciated.

      I think I must be getting old...(well, I know I am).

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